MEDIA & THE ARTS

Houston Recognizes Latino Film Festival

Mayor Sylvester Turner presents the HLFF founders Dave Cebrero, David Cortez and Pedro Rivas with a proclamation announcing March 28-31, 2019 as “Houston Latino Film Festival Days” in recognition of the festival’s contribution to the city’s diverse culture

 

 

 

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We are happy to announce the 2019 Houston Latino Film Festival winners, as determined by festival jurors and audience decision. BEST FEATURE "Wiñaypacha (Eternity)" Director: Oscar Catacora Peru BEST SHORT "Your Last Day on Earth" Director: Marc Martínez Jordán Spain BEST STUDENT "Golden Malibu" Director: Natalia Bermúdez Fierro Mexico AUDIENCE AWARD BEST SHORT “We're Going to Paris” Director: David Norris Puerto Rico AUDIENCE AWARD BEST FEATURE “Retablo" Director: Alvaro Delgado Aparicio Peru Congratulations to these talented filmmakers! We received many amazing submissions, and we look forward to more original and fascinating films like these next year!

A post shared by Houston Latino Film Festival (@houstonlatinofilmfestival) on

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about the artist who designed the poster, from Houston Latino Film Festival fb page:

Our official poster for the 4th Annual Houston Latino Film Festival is here! We’d like to thank Peruvian artist, Daniel Cortez (aka Decertor), for collaborating with us and providing us with this beautiful artwork that you will see around town and during the festival. In this piece, you will see themes of unity and creative expression, which represent our motto this year – “El Cine Nos Une” (Cinema Unites Us).

ABOUT THE ARTIST
Daniel Cortez is from Lima, Peru. He is a painter interested in building weatherproof memories in public spaces. He began his career with no formal studies in art, and his first inspiration came from portraits of the common man and woman that make up the human scenery of the Peruvian cities. His style started with the exercise of realism but then developed to emphasize the interconnectivity between the individual and the community in the social psyche. As an active street painter, he was part of the Hip Hop movement in Lima, always involving his work on social issues. This contributed to finding their way on muralism, risking new formats, and reinterpreting pre-Hispanic iconography in his style.

Currently, Decertor feeds on the social context and the architectural sites that he chooses to do his work, always seeking for an active confrontation of the mural with the viewers. He believes that street painting is an effective tool to bring social and global issues to the fore. He strives to perform his work by decentralizing and democratizing the walls, which transforms them and elicits their humanity. Thinking of the arts as an excuse to continue painting, his work has transcended his hometown borders and can be found in cities such as Cartagena in Colombia, Cochabamba in Bolivia, Mexico City in Mexico, Buenos Aires in Argentina, Azemmour in Morocco, among others.

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